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The Honolulu Advertiser
Posted on: Wednesday, June 21, 2006

HAWAI'I BRIEFS
Retired officer helps nab thieves

Advertiser Staff and News Reports

Two men picked the wrong time and place to break into a car in Wai'anae on Monday.

A retired police officer told police that at about 5 p.m. he saw a vehicle drive up to a parked car.

A passenger then reportedly got out of the car, broke into the parked car and later left the scene in the car he had arrived in.

Police said the retired officer called them with the car's license number and a description of the man he said he saw break into the parked car.

Within 20 minutes, uniformed officers located the car in Wai'anae and ordered the driver to pull over. The passenger jumped out and ran, but the driver was detained.

The owner of the parked car was taken to the scene of the traffic stop where he identified items inside the car.

Police arrested the driver on suspicion of unlawful entry into a motor vehicle. The man who jumped from the car and ran remained at large yesterday, police said.




HONOLULU

TWO CHARGED WITH METH CONSPIRACY

Two Honolulu men have been charged with conspiracy to possess and distribute about five pounds of methamphetamine.

Shane K. "Sumo" Nakamiyo, 32, and Ricky G. Unutoa, 45, were charged this week in a federal complaint. Both men were arrested June 14 after they attempted to pick up the drugs at a Waikiki hotel, according to court documents.

The drugs were seized by police in Los Angeles as a man and woman attempted to smuggle the methamphetamine to Hawai'i, the affidavit said. Both cooperated with authorities and told police that the drugs were to be picked up in Honolulu by two men, identified in the affidavit as Nakamiyo and Unutoa.

Members of the Hawai'i Airport Task Force arranged for the men to pick up the drugs on June 14 and Nakamiyo and Unutoa were arrested as they showed up at the hotel. Authorities also recovered $111,500 from the men's car, the affidavit said.



LAB SCHOOL FIRE FUND AT $29,775

The University of Hawai'i Foundation has received $29,775 in donations for the College of Education/University Laboratory School's fire recovery fund as of Monday.

Those wishing to donate to the fire recovery effort can do so through the University of Hawai'i Foundation in three ways:

  • Online: visit www.uhf.hawaii.edu and select the College of Education/University Laboratory School Fire Recovery Fund.

  • By phone: 956-8849

  • By mail: send donations to: University of Hawai'i Foundation, P.O. Box 11270, Honolulu, HI 96828-0270.

    Checks can be made to "The UH Foundation" and all contributions should be marked for the "Fire Recovery Fund."

    On Monday, investigators concluded that the June 13 fire at University Laboratory School was intentionally set.

    Fire officials said damage estimates are $6 million for the building and $500,000 for contents, but school officials have said those figures could go up.



    SHOWS TEACH KEIKI ABOUT RECYCLING

    On Monday, recycling shows started touring 48 of the city's summer fun sites, and will continue through July 13. Three local performing groups will use music, storytelling and interactive performances to teach children the importance of recycling.

    The performers draw on recycling songs by the Lava Jam Band and Jack Johnson, and include some original pieces like "Start with a Can" and "It's Piling Up" to drive the message home.

    Performances are sponsored by the city.

    Recycling shows at the summer fun programs are not open to the public.

    However, the public can catch these shows at the city's second annual Discover Recycling Fair, Sept. 21, 22 and 28 at the Blaisdell Arena, for free.

    These shows also will be made available to O'ahu schools during the upcoming school year.




    NORTH SHORE

    HALE'IWA HARBOR REPAIRS APPROVED

    Aging Hale'iwa Boat Harbor will get $415,000 to spruce up and replace deteriorating piers, slips and docks, including utilities, the office of Gov. Linda Lingle announced yesterday.

    The money also will provide for modifications, structural repairs to the main walkway and the addition of electrical outlets to Pier 200.

    The announcement said with the $50,000 design costs added in, the total design and construction tab will come to $465,000. The project is expected to be completed in June 2007.




    MAUI

    WOMAN DIES FOLLOWING CRASH

    WAILUKU A 52-year-old woman died after her 1993 Nissan pickup truck crashed into a traffic signal pole Monday on Mokulele Highway.

    Police said Karren Anne Esposito of Makawao was headed toward Kahului when her vehicle veered onto the right shoulder at about 9 p.m. at the Kama'aina Road intersection. She died at Maui Memorial Medical Center.

    Witness accounts of the accident suggest Esposito may have suffered a medical problem before the crash, according to Lt. Jeffrey Tanoue of the Maui Police Department. An autopsy is scheduled for tomorrow to determine the cause of death.




    BIG ISLAND

    HILO INCINERATOR TO REPLACE LANDFILL

    Hawai'i County plans to build an incinerator in Hilo that would start burning East Hawai'i's garbage in four years.

    The county has been looking for trash-disposal solutions because its Hilo landfill one of two on the Big Island must be closed well before a replacement will be ready for use.

    The Hilo dump would already be full if not for the county's recent, 11th-hour move to delay closure a couple of years by packing trash around its sides.

    County solid waste officials and a team of Mainland experts have selected three finalists from among 12 companies bidding to build the incinerator.

    Covanta Energy Corp., L-Con Constructors and Wheelabrator Technologies Inc. will be asked to submit their ideas for an incinerator design by October.

    They will be asked to include detailed information on costs, emissions and processing levels in their proposal.

    The county hopes to select a vendor in November and sign a contract by February.

    Several county, state and federal permits would be needed before an incinerator started burning garbage.