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The Honolulu Advertiser
Posted on: Saturday, March 18, 2006

BUSINESS BRIEFS
ML&P names financial officer

Advertiser Staff and News Services

Maui Land & Pineapple Co. has appointed Robert Webber chief financial officer and senior vice president of business development effective April 24.

Webber most recently served as President of DynTek Inc., a leading provider of professional technology services, information technology network infrastructure and security software and hardware. Before that he served as DynTek's chief financial officer and director.

"Rob brings extensive and highly relevant experience to our company at a critical stage in our turnaround," said David Cole, ML&P chairman, president and chief executive officer.

Webber replaces Fred Rickert, who will now serve as vice president of finance and treasurer for ML&P.


VERIZON TO OPEN TWO NEW STORES

Verizon Wireless yesterday said it will open two additional stores on O'ahu within 60 days to meet consumer demand. The new stores will be in Pearlridge Center and the Moanalua Shopping Center and join the recently opened downtown Honolulu store.

The new stores will bring the total number of stores in the state to 13, while bringing the total of Verizon Wireless employees in the state to more than 180.


COMPANY DELAYS ANNUAL REPORT

The parent of Hawaiian Airlines will delay the filing of its annual report for 2005.

Hawaiian Holdings Inc. yesterday filed for an extension with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Earlier this week, Hawaiian said it increased its financing by $91 million to help pay for the purchase of four aircraft.


CITY JOBLESS RATE LOWEST IN U.S.

Honolulu was lowest among all metropolitan areas with a non-seasonally adjusted unemployment rate of 2.2 percent in January, according to the U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Nine other metropolitan areas had rates below 3 percent. Nine more had unemployment rates above 10 percent, led by Gulfport-Biloxi, Miss. with 17.9 percent.


PILOTS SEEK TO RETAIN CONTRACT

WASHINGTON The pilots union of Delta Air Lines Inc. sought to show yesterday that flying a commercial plane with the lives of hundreds of passengers at stake is a stressful, time-consuming and heavily regulated job that requires a lot of training and professionalism and ultimately good pay.

An arbitration panel will decide whether to allow the nation's third-largest carrier to void its pilot contract and impose up to $325 million in long-term pay and benefit cuts. The union says it will strike if its contract is thrown out.