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The Honolulu Advertiser
Posted on: Wednesday, September 6, 2006

Letters to the Editor

PAGE ONE

HEADLINE AN AFFRONT TO JOURNALISM ETHICS

The Page One headline on Friday, "Advantage: Case," was a blatant offense against journalism ethics.

My first response to the headline was, "Who paid for this?" There was no data from a poll that would give some legitimacy to the headline.

This is a prime example of writing an opinion as a fact covering a U.S. Senate race.

Explain your ethics on the front page.

Mary Guinger
Kailua

POSTAL SERVICE

JUNK MAIL SOLUTION AS EASY AS LETTER TO DMA

Regarding recent letters complaining about receiving "junk mail," there is a very simple solution: Mail a post card or letter to: Direct Marketing Association, Mail Preference Service, P.O. Box 9008, Farmingdale, NY 11735-9008 and ask that your name be removed from lists used by its members.

Donald D. Graber
Honolulu

SENATE RACE

DEBATE STRENGTHENED REASON TO VOTE AKAKA

For those who know Sen. Dan Akaka and Rep. Ed Case, the debate did not produce any surprises. Sen. Akaka's sincere desire to help the citizens of Hawai'i was obvious. Rep. Case's quick and glib responses were also obvious.

An example of Case's effort to slant his responses was his attempt to separate age from transition. There is no question that his campaign theme of transition is tied to Sen. Akaka's age.

Sen. Akaka, on the other hand, is straightforward and addresses the issues honestly.

If anything, this debate strengthens the reason for voting for Sen. Akaka.

B. Martin Luna
Wailuku

AKAKA IS THE ISLANDS' AMBASSADOR OF ALOHA

Within the first two years of serving in the Senate, Sen. Dan Akaka passed the single greatest piece of pro-Hawaiian legislation: the Apology Bill. He has worked tirelessly as an advocate for justice, a champion of workers' rights and to promote the values and needs of the Islands.

Akaka is an honest man who has never lied to his constituents and colleagues, a man of character. Our dignified senator is a workhorse, not a show horse.

Today, Akaka is using his seniority to quietly, but adamantly, work within the U.S. Senate to support America's veterans and secure facilities and benefits for their valiant service.

Akaka is pushing to reduce the burden the war has had on our country's middle class.

Over the years, the senator has become the ambassador of aloha.

A vote for Akaka is a vote for aloha and for our unique Hawaiian way of life.

Imua, Sen. Akaka.

Kekoa McClellan
Honolulu

CASE DEBATE RESPONSES TRIGGER VOTE FOR AKAKA

At the end of the Aug. 31 televised debate, Rep. Ed Case asked voters to make their choice on:

  • Transition U.S. Senate experience and relationships are most important. Case has none.

  • Welfare and security Both are impacted by the biggest U.S. deficit in history. Case helped increase the U.S. deficit by voting for tax cuts for the rich and for the Iraq war.

  • Effectiveness Seniority is power in the U.S. Senate. Case has none.

  • Change Hawai'i issues must be first on the mind of our U.S. senator. Case says national issues must be first on the mind of our U.S. senator. Huh?

    Thank you, Rep. Case you made it easy for me. Sen. Dan Akaka is my choice.

    Diane O'Sullivan
    Waialua

    PUBLIC POLICY NOT WON BY TELEVISED DEBATES

    Even new citizens understand that public policy and funding are not won by public debate, but by steady and patient behind-the-scenes agreements among colleagues in national forums.

    A congressional debate is a show most suited to a lawyer, not an advocate for Hawai'i.

    Give me Sen. Dan Akaka every time, delivering votes and dollars for Hawai'i!

    Zheng Qirong
    Honolulu

    DEMOCRATS MISSED BOAT IN 2006 CAMPAIGN

    We've been bombarded by all of the arguments for and against Sen. Dan Akaka and Rep. Ed Case. I am sure that they are both fine, upstanding gentlemen. However, I think Democrats have missed the boat in this election campaign.

    We all know, and I'm sure even Akaka and Sen. Daniel Inouye would agree, that they will not be able to hold office indefinitely. Instead of Democratic infighting, they should be thinking about the future of our representation.

    It would have made sense for Akaka to step down at the end of this term to back a new candidate whom both he and Inouye could guide and "show the ropes." Now is the time to show true leadership and vision for our state.

    Enough of the mudslinging and negative commentary thinking about our future necessitates stepping outside of the proverbial box.

    Someone needs to take that first step!

    Susan Ramie
    'Ewa Beach

    TIME HAS COME FOR AKAKA TO RETURN HOME

    In the mid 1970s, when I was a political leader for the Republican Party in Windward O'ahu, I met with a bipartisan group in Waimanalo.

    The focus of that meeting was to take steps to ensure that a Native Hawaiian, finally, would sit in the U.S. Congress. His family background was a major reason for our decision. We helped Daniel Akaka become a U.S. congressman.

    Dan is now a senator and seeks re-election. I have seen how the years have taken a toll on this fine man and I respect his unselfish contribution to our state and its people. I believe the time has arrived for him to come home.

    Sen. Akaka, come home to the land of your birth. Inspire our young people and share the wisdom of your experience. Native Hawaiians need a leader here at home, a person they can respect, admire and follow. Until such a leader comes forward, your people will fragment into small groups of activists at odds with each other. Time is working against the ideals you cherish.

    Ken Stevens
    Kapolei

    AKAKA'S INTEGRITY CAME ACROSS IN TV DEBATE

    Rep. Ed Case may come across as a more eloquent speaker, but I hope people can see and feel the integrity and sincerity of Sen. Dan Akaka.

    Akaka can still lead us for a bit longer while we find a future replacement definitely not Case. Best wishes to Akaka!

    Lalita Price
    Kailua

    ENDORSEMENT

    VALIDITY OF SENIORITY ARGUMENT QUESTIONED

    On Sunday, The Advertiser endorsed Sen. Dan Akaka for the U S. Senate, rationalizing that his seniority and connections on key Senate committees put him in a position of greater influence to secure legislation of benefit to Hawai'i.

    Yet, several unbiased and respected sources rank Sen. Akaka as one of the least influential senators, raising serious questions on the validity of the seniority argument.

    The Advertiser, as the largest and most influential newspaper in the state, has the responsibility to explain this disparity to its readers.

    Bobbie Ubersax
    Waimanalo

    PAPER SET LOGICAL ARGUMENT FOR AKAKA

    I was glad to see The Advertiser's endorsement of Sen. Dan Akaka.

    The editorial articulated very well the differences between the two candidates and why Sen. Akaka is still the best choice for Hawai'i. With all due respect to the Akaka campaign, I have not yet seen the campaign effectively articulate the reasons that Hawai'i's voters should continue to support Sen. Akaka.

    The Advertiser editorial is the first piece that has set forth logical reasons and a theme that voters should consider in selecting Sen. Akaka. I agree with the editorial's conclusion when it states that Sen. Akaka has been a champion of Hawai'i values for decades.

    To take that one step further, the race for U.S. senator is really an election on whether people continue to believe in the values that make Hawai'i such a special place, i.e., sincerity, generosity, compassion, trustworthiness, consideration for others, respect for your elders, or if the people of Hawai'i want to be more like "mainstream America," a place and value system with which Rep. Ed Case believes Hawai'i should be more in tune.

    Richard N. Wurdeman
    Honolulu

    PAPER'S REASONING MADE CASE FOR CASE

    Regardless of whether or not it is accepted for a newspaper to endorse a candidate, I am bothered by the practice.

    Individuals look to news sources as a place to gather facts so they can make decisions on their own, at least in theory. By endorsing Sen. Dan Akaka, The Advertiser has given an out to those individuals who were either too lazy or indecisive to make a decision for themselves.

    If The Advertiser must support a candidate, it should at least listen to its own advice. The statement, "Hawai'i needs new leaders. Moving the party ahead not running in place should be its imperative," is an endorsement for Case.

    With two senators aged 81 and 82, it is hard to imagine both will continue past this next term. If we are worried about the repercussions of a single junior senator this term, having two rookies in the next term will be disastrous.

    We shouldn't let Akaka turn into the next Sleeping (Sen. Strom) Thurmond just because he reminds us of our story-telling grandfather.

    Brad Ching
    Honolulu