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The Honolulu Advertiser
Posted on: Saturday, December 19, 2009

On this date: 1990 Bo Jackson first athlete chosen for All-Star games in two sports


Associated Press

Dec. 19

1913 Heavyweight champion Jack Johnson fights to a 10-round draw with Battling Jim Johnson in Paris.

1917 Joe Malone of the Montreal Canadiens scores five goals in a 9-4 victory over the Ottawa Senators.

1917 Harry Hyland of the Montreal Wanderers scores five goals in a 10-9 victory over the Toronto Maple Leafs.

1948 The Philadelphia Eagles win the NFL title, beating the Chicago Cardinals 7-0 in a major snowstorm. Philadelphia's Bucko Kilroy recovers a fumble on the 17-yard line in the fourth period, and Steve Van Buren later scores from the 5.

1984 In his 632nd NHL game, Wayne Gretzky of the Edmonton Oilers scores the 1,000th point of his career with an assist in a 7-3 victory over the Los Angeles Kings.

1990 Los Angeles Raiders running back Bo Jackson is named to the AFC team, as a reserve, becoming the first athlete chosen for All-Star games in two sports.

2004 The Kansas City Chiefs are the first team in NFL history to have three backs rush for more than 150 yards in a game in one season. Larry Johnson had 151 in a 45-17 win against Denver, matching the amount Priest Holmes had against the Broncos earlier in the season. Derrick Blaylock rushed for 186 against New Orleans.

2005 Toronto goalie Ed Belfour moves into sole possession of second place on the NHL's career wins list with a 9-6 victory over the New York Islanders. He wins his 448th game despite allowing six goals on 33 shots. Belfour had lost five straight starts after moving into a second-place tie with Terry Sawchuk.

2007 New York Islanders forward Chris Simon is banned for 30 games, drawing the longest suspension in NHL history again. Simon's latest infraction was stepping on Pittsburgh's Jarkko Ruutu with his skate during a Dec. 15 game. This is the seventh suspension of Simon's career.