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The Honolulu Advertiser
Posted on: Thursday, June 25, 2009

ISLAND LIFE SHORTS
Keep fit by using stretchy bands

Advertiser Staff and News Services

Hawaii news photo - The Honolulu Advertiser

In an online video, natural medicine expert Laurie Steelsmith, right, explains how to use stretchy bands.

Courtesy of Pacificnetwork.tv

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ADVERTISER BLOGS

See a video about exercise using stretchy bands at Edgy Lee's Life is Good blog.

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OK. They're not just for girls. Everyone can use stretchy bands.

"Natural Choices for Women's Health" author and natural medicine expert Laurie Steelsmith shows us that exercise is something you can do easily, anytime, anywhere.

In this Pacific Network webisode (see link below), she uses stretchy bands no need for a gym for exercises you can do at work or in between taking the kids to piano lessons or writing that hit novel.

With these bands, you can work out your deltoid muscles, buttocks, arms. It's great for working women during breaks and for middle-aged folks who want to get some form of exercise during a busy day. Anyone can do it, starting modestly and increasing the effort as you go.

To see the entire clip and more of Laurie's show, written and produced by journalist and former Honolulu Advertiser writer Beverly Creamer, go to the Health Channel on www.PacificNetwork.tv at www.health.pacificnetwork.tv/HotPicks.

Pacific Network

MAKE IT A HABIT

YOU NEED EVERYDAY SUN PROTECTION

To a certain extent, the importance of sunscreen has been drilled into our brains. We slather sunscreen on before hitting the beach, heading over to the park or anywhere we associate with sun and recreation.

But the Hawaii Skin Cancer Coalition points out that people don't necessarily think to protect their skin when they head out to wash their cars, walk their children to school, chat outdoors with neighbors or go shopping. All that exposure adds up, so along with the Hawaii Dermatological Society, the coalition will be offering free skin cancer screening at the Kapi'olani Community College farmers market from 7:30 to 9:30 a.m. Saturday. The screening will be given on a first-come, first-served basis, along with sun protection educational resources and materials.

For those who can't make it, the coalition recommends daily use of sunscreen, along with protective clothing like sun hats and long sleeves and, of course, daily application of sunscreen those with SPF 15 to 30 block most of the sun's harmful rays.

To learn more, call the National Cancer Institute Information Service toll-free at 800-4-CANCER (800-422-6237), or the American Cancer Society at 800-ACS-2345 (800-227-2345).