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The Honolulu Advertiser
Posted on: Tuesday, February 16, 2010

Alleged Toyota death toll reaches 34


Associated Press

Hawaii news photo - The Honolulu Advertiser

A modified accelerator pedal from a 2007 Toyota Camry Hybrid is replaced during recall service.

Associated Press file photo

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Hawaii news photo - The Honolulu Advertiser

Toyota Motor Corp. President Akio Toyoda is scheduled to answer more questions on the company's massive vehicle recall at a press conference tomorrow.

ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO | Feb. 9, 2010

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WASHINGTON Complaints of deaths connected to sudden acceleration in Toyota vehicles have surged in recent weeks, with the alleged death toll reaching 34 since 2000, according to new consumer data gathered by the government.

Complaints to a database maintained by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration about the popular Toyota Prius hybrid grew by nearly 1,000 in just more than a week.

Yesterday, Transportation Department spokeswoman Olivia Alair said NHTSA is quickly gathering information to help guide the government's examination of sudden acceleration, the Prius braking system and other safety issues.

Toyota Motor Corp. has recalled 8.5 million vehicles globally during the past four months because of problems with gas pedals, floor mats and brakes, threatening the safety and quality reputation of the world's No. 1 automaker. The government typically receives a surge in complaints following a recall. None has yet been verified.

The new complaints reflect the heightened awareness of the massive recalls among the public and underscore a flurry of lawsuits on behalf of drivers alleging deaths and injuries in Toyota crashes. Three congressional hearings are planned on the Toyota recalls.

In the past three weeks, consumers have told the government about nine crashes involving 13 alleged deaths between 2005 and 2010 due to accelerator problems, according to an NHTSA database. The latest reports are in addition to previous complaints from consumers that alleged 21 deaths from 2000 to the end of last year.

The database also shows that new complaints skyrocketed over the 2010 Prius gas-electric hybrid, which was recalled last week to replace braking software.

When NHTSA opened its investigation of Prius on Feb. 3, the government had received 124 consumer complaints. Through Feb. 11, the government had a total of 1,120 complaints alleging 34 crashes, six injuries and no deaths.

The government has renewed an investigation into potential electromagnetic problems in vehicles built by Toyota and other manufacturers.

Consumer groups have pointed to potential electrical problems while the company has said recalls to fix sticking gas pedals or accelerators that can become jammed will address the problem.

Toyota spokeswoman Martha Voss said the company takes "all customer reports seriously and will, of course, look into new claims." Toyota was taking steps to improve quality control and investigate customer complaints more aggressively, Voss said.

Testing by Toyota, NHTSA and Exponent, an outside consulting firm hired by Toyota, has found no evidence of problems with Toyota's electronics, said Toyota Vice President Bob Carter at the National Automobile Dealers Association convention in Orlando, Fla.

"There is no problem with the electronic throttle system in Toyotas," Carter said yesterday. "There's not anything that can even remotely lead you in that direction." Carter said Exponent was told to tear the components apart to try to find anything wrong and initial tests could find nothing.

Carter said Toyota has repaired about 500,000 of the 2.3 million vehicles recalled over a potentially sticky gas pedal.

Toyota has received many complaints over vehicle speed control in the 2009 and 2008 model years, according to an Associated Press analysis of government data.

In 2009, Toyota received the most complaints that year a total of 130 for Toyota, Lexus and Scion vehicles.

Ford and its Mercury brand received the second-highest with 14, followed by General Motors and Honda vehicles with nine.

Today, Toyota announced its president will answer more questions on the recall at a press conference tomorrow after being lambasted for being largely invisible during the crisis.

Toyota Motor Corp. President Akio Toyoda who may appear at U.S. congressional hearings later this month will give updates on the global recall of some 400,000 Prius gas-electric hybrids at the Tokyo news conference, the company said today.

Calls have been growing for Toyoda to answer questions from U.S. lawmakers. Toyoda told reporters last week he planned to go to the United States, mainly to talk to American workers and dealers.